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dynamicafrica:

Ifè Art in Ancient Nigeria 

Made from terracotta, bronze, and stone, and dating between approximately 1000 - 1500 A.D., these highly valued pieces of intricately constructed artwork are examples of pre-colonial art originating from the Yoruba people of Ilé-Ifè in southwestern Nigeria.

Ranging from life-size busts to full-length full-body sculptures, as well as animals, these objects are considered examples of realism for their naturalistic and human-like appearances, and most often depict people who made up the elite and ruling class during this time. As people of importance, the large busts made in the likeness of the rulers of Ilé-Ifè were often depicted with large heads because the artists believed that the Ase - the inner power and energy - of a person was held in the head. Rulers were also often depicted with their mouths covered so the “power of their speech would not be too great”. Individual people were not idealized, but rather the office of the king.

In Yoruba tradition, women occupied the position of clay workers whilst traditionally the sculptors of stone, metal, and wood. Involving both terracotta and metalworking, the production of bronze cast works may have been collaborative efforts.

Nigerian literary philosopher, author, poet and playwright Yemi D. Prince, who specializes in Yoruba history, claimed in his book, “The Oral Traditions in Ile-Ife,” that the terracotta artists of 900 A.D. were the founders of Art Guilds - cultural schools of philosophy, which today can be likened to many of Europe’s old institutions of learning that were originally established as religious bodies. These guilds could very well be some of the oldest non-Abrahamic African centres of learning to remain as viable entities in the contemporary world.

Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria, an exhibition that is co-organized by the Museum for African Art, New York, and Fundacion Botin, Santander, Spain, in collaboration with the National Commission for Museums and Monuments, Nigeria, is currently on view in Stockholm, Sweden.

(sources: 1, 2, 3)

Highlighting African Art & African Artists

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All Africa, All the time.

omgwideworld:

This wonder of nature is The Underwater Waterfall of Mauritius Island.

Mauritius Island is located in the Indian ocean, east of Madagascar. This island is home to one of Earth’s most  amazing sights: The underwater waterfall.

The waterfall is actually just an optical illusion. It is sand washed in  patterns to create the picture of a waterfall under the waters. You can see the ‘waterfall’ from both boat level and from satellites orbiting the earth.

Underwater waterfalls are not the only beauty that belongs to the Mauritius island. The island is a home and haven to turtles and beautiful beaches.

source

cross-connect:

Stone Fields, Generative Sculpture by Giuseppe Randazzo

This project has started from a search for a 3d-objects optimal packing algorithm over a surface, but evolved in something rather different. I love the work by Richard Long, from which this project takes its cue. The way he fills lonely landscapes with arcaic stones patterns and its eroic artistic practice, in his monumental vision, is in strong contrast with this computational approach that – ironically – allows virtual stones creation and sorting in a non phisical, mental way, a ‘lazy’ version, so to speak. The virtual stones created from several fractal subdivision strategies, find their proper position within the circle, with a trial and error hierarchical algorythm. A mix of attractors and scalar fields (some with Perlin noise) drives the density and size of the stones. The code is a C++ console application that outputs a OBJ 3d file.

Selected and Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

malcolmxvideos:

     We don’t judge a man because of the color of his skin. We don’t judge you because you’re white, we don’t judge you because you’re black, we don’t judge you because you’re brown. We judge you because of what you do and what you practice. And as long as you practice evil, we’re against you. And for us, the worst form of evil is the evil that’s based upon judging a man because of the color of his skin. And I don’t think anybody here can deny that we’re living in a society that just doesn’t judge a man according to his talents, according to his know-how, according to his possibility, background, or lack of academic background. This society judges a man solely upon the color of his skin. If you’re white, you can go forward, and if you’re black, you have to fight your way every step of the way, and you still don’t get forward.
     We are living in a society that is by and large controlled by people who believe in segregation. We are living in a society that is by and large controlled by a people who believe in racism, and practice segregation and discrimination and racism. We believe in and I say that it is controlled, not by the well-meaning whites, but controlled by the segregationists, the racists. And you can see by the pattern that this society follows all over the world. Right now in Asia you have the American army dropping bombs on darkskinned people. You can’t say that—it’s as though you can justify being that far from home, dropping bombs on somebody else. If you were next door, I could see it, but you can’t go that far away from this country and drop bombs on somebody else and justify your presence over there, not with me.
     It’s racism, racism practiced by America. Racism which involves a war against the dark-skinned people in Asia, another form of racism involving a war against the dark-skinned people in the Congo, as it involves a war against the dark-skinned people in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Rochester, New York. So we’re not against people because they’re white. But we’re against those who practice racism. We’re against those who drop bombs on people because their color happens to be of a different shade than yours. And because we’re against it, the press says we’re violent. We’re not for violence. We’re for peace. But the people that we’re up against are for violence. You can’t be peaceful when you’re dealing with them. They accuse us of what they themselves are guilty of. This is what the criminal always does. They’ll bomb you, then accuse you of bombing yourself. They’ll crush your skull, then accuse you of attacking him. This is what the racists have always done the criminal, the one who has criminal processes developed to a science. Their practice is criminal action. And then use the press to make you victim—look like the victim is the criminal, and the criminal is the victim. This is how they do it.
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